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CAFE DE LA GRILLE, CAPESTANG: RESTAURANT REVIEW

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I lived 50 miles from New York City for most of my life and I never visited Liberty Island, home of the Statue of Liberty. I've seen that green lady in the harbor hundreds of times on visits NYC. I've just never taken the time to take the ferry and check her out up close. Familiarity breeds contempt? Who knows? Do I regret the omission? Only a little. There was always something else worthwhile on the agenda. Maybe next time, when...if...I'm back in the neighborhood.

It's been at least two years, maybe three, since we've lunched at Cafe de la Grille. I have no idea why it's been so long. We've had coffee there dozens of times on visits to the market in the square in Capestang that the Cafe de la Grille faces. We just haven't stopped for a meal. That changed last week. Spur of the moment. We were passing through Capestang. It was just past noon. Let's have lunch.

We're glad that we did.

The covered patio was bustling on a late summer Thursday afternoon, a comfortable day after the summer heat had broken and you could begin to feel autumn in the air. It's a pleasant space, nearly full with families, couples, and the guy who manages the cave cooperatif. We think that the folks next to us might have been boat people, two couples whose conversation moved seamlessly between English and French. That's Capestang for you.

Cathey ordered from the menu of the day. She started with a small salad accompanied by a bit of quiche Lorraine. Cathey puts together a fine quiche herself, so her obvious enjoyment was an important endorsement. For the main, poitrine porc, pork belly, with frites. I've said before that one of the joys of eating in France is that the food tastes just like it's supposed to. Do you like pork? You can't get much porkier than good pork belly. And this was good pork belly.

I ordered the Assiette de la Grille, an assortment of charcuterie that delighted this carnivore. The picture tells the story, a full plate and a varied assortment. My side order of frites was, like Cathey's, fresh-cut and substantial.

With a demi of rosé, the bill just topped €34, a fair price for a filling, wholly satisfactory meal.

You can read more of my restaurant reviews HERE




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