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LAUZA, BORDEAUX: RESTAURANT QUICK TAKE

We chose the hottest day of the year to travel to Bordeaux. Of course. And the air-conditioned train conditioned the air to at least 30C if not higher. (85F for the Americans in the audience.) So after a five-hour ride - leaving a half-hour late and losing another half-hour on the way - we were hot and tired when we arrived in Bordeaux for our first ever visit. Hot and tired and hungry.

I had spent some time researching restaurants online before our arrival but none of my favored choices were in walking distance from our Airbnb. We were ready to eat and unpack and lie down RIGHT NOW. Two restaurants situated a couple of doors down didn't work for us. One was strictly Italian. Although at another time in another place it might have been an interesting choice, we didn't come to Bordeaux to eat Italian. The other had a simple card on the door: Dinner 60€. No menu. Wine included? Too much for a pig in a poke. So we set out walking down the block. It's an indication of how tired I was that I didn't bring along my tablet or camera.

Enter Lauza.

It's a narrow room and not too deep. Tables for maybe twenty-five or thirty covers. Nicely pointed old stone walls, simple furnishings, and American blues...not too loud...playing in the background. Was that ZZ Top? Pleasant staff. A young gent who practiced his English on us while we practiced our French on him and a young lady who performed all duties as well. Maybe a couple? Macht nichts.

We didn't go for the full dinner. Just one of the plates of the day. We both chose the pork and we were not disappointed. It may have been the best slice of pork that we've ever tasted. Tender and flavorful and a little ribbon of fat at the edges for moisture and cooked to perfection. We asked about it. The pork was from Aveyron as was the chef, who sourced the meat himself. Accompanied by perfectly roasted veggies, the plate addressed our hunger while satisfying our palate.

I couldn't resist dessert and Lauza delivered a fruity little concoction topped with a coffee-infused cream and a touch of chocolate just because I had asked if there was any chocolate on the menu.

Price? 82€ that included a bottle of wine that cost more than the pork plat du jour itself. City prices. But that's what we expected. Bordeaux is a city. And since all was proper, from greeting through service through preparation and execution, we have no complaints.

Recommended.

Find Lauza's website HERE. You can read more of my restaurant reviews HERE.

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