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LE DOLMEN, CEBAZAN: 9.6 KM WALK IN THE WOODS AND THE VINES

Our grey and chilly spring means that it's difficult to decide how to dress for one of our group jaunts. And so it was this past Monday, the last day of April, 2018. Grey and chilly as we headed out on a walk that most of us have taken before, starting in a little parking lot on the north side of Cebazan. Seven of us wore tees or polos, down or fleece, Pants or shorts. Layers of one type or another, certainly. Eventually, the day heated up and so did we.

But it's not about fashion. It's about the exercise and the views. And so, here are the pics. More walks and other observations on French life HERE.


Seven walkers. Two cars.
The 'official' walks generally have these signs at the start. And they are very well marked with color-coded dabs of paint along the trail for walkers, mountain bikers, and horses, fresh this year.
Through the alley is not a very promising start.
But things open up fairly quickly. On this walk, the Sleeping Lady was often in view. This is not her best profile.
Climb. Take a picture.
Climb. Take a picture. (Better profile.)
Climb...
Stop and talk...

...and point stuff out.
It seems that no matter where you go, you aren't far from the vines.
No, not a car in the ditch. Just a bumper complete with tag.
More climbing and more vines.
And more vines.

Entering the woods, now. Shedding layers. In the distance, the last of the climbs...of the first half of the walk.

After crossing the road that could have taken us back to Cebazan, we continue. Continuing means another climb, this time single file.
You see these ruined stone walls and building shells everywhere. I keep threatening to bring a shovel, find an old trash pile, and see what I can dig up. I'm not certain that it would be legal, though.
A long stretch of scree not good for weak ankles or poorly shod feet.


There's bound to be a trash pile somewhere near a ruin like this. At least, that's what I tell myself.

You don't usually see these sorts of signs but several trails intersect this one.

One day I WILL bring a shovel.
Ooops. More inadvertent art photography...
At the top of the second half of the walk. We are assured that it's all downhill from here...and it mostly is.

For all of my friends in eastern Pennsylvania, check out the old lime kiln...
...complete with picnic area...

...because there's another intersection right there.

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