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The TSA, Body Scans, Pat Downs, and the Fourth Amendment

I'm getting old. I expect that the obvious will be recognized. How silly is that?

9/11. The Shoe Bomber. The Christmas Bomber. The Printer Bombs.

What's the common thread?

Airplanes.

What's that you say? We're always responding to the last threat? Well, they've been hijacking planes for 80 years, in January of 1969 eight planes were diverted to Cuba, Wikipedia lists 18 'notable' hijackings in the 1980s, the Underwear Bomb fizzled just about a year ago, and the Printer Bombs were discovered about a month ago. It would seem that the threat is continuing and the threat is still real.

I admit that I simply don't understand the argument against scans and pat downs. First of all, in carny parlance, ya pays yer money and ya take yer chances. When you buy your ticket, you know that you're going to have to go through security. You're worried about your privacy? Don't fly. Live in a shack in the woods. I understand that the Unibomber's bungalow is up for auction.

That's harsh, you say? Flying from here to there is necessary. It's 2010. Times have changed.

Exactly.

Deal with it.

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