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TRUFFLE MARKET, VILLENEUVE-MINERVOIS: QUICK TAKE WITH PICS

Our visit to the truffle market in Villeneuve-Minervois this year during the third week of January was at least our fifth such pilgrimage and we've enjoyed each and every one. You see, truffles have a very particular taste and aroma. Not everybody gets it. Cathey is particularly sensitive and particularly appreciative. Foodie heaven. I can smell the aroma and I can taste the taste. But, like opera, my appreciation is on an intellectual level. My soul is not moved.

Here are some pics and comments concerning our recent visit. You can find a more comprehensive description of a previous visit HERE.

The same gent has been the arbiter in each of our visits. He takes a small snip of each truffle and checks the aroma. Aroma is pretty much all that counts. It's a pass/fail test with no argument. We call him The Nose.
Meticulous records are kept. Even the snippings are carefully bagged.
Cathey watches The Nose carefully. She looks for subtle signs indicating the best batch. This year, she picked this gent's truffles as the most fragrant. Can you see Eric Clapton?
We save the truffles in a jar with eggs in the fridge until ready to use, changing the paper underneath daily. A mandolin is used to shave the truffle as thin as possible, opening up the greatest surface area. Cathey likes hers on tagliatelle with a simple cream sauce. I like mine with the eggs that have been infused with the scent of the truffle.





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