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CATS ...BECAUSE CATS ARE A THING

I'm a cat person. My wife Cathey is a cat person. Specifically, we are Siamese cat people. Because Siamese are a special breed. Smart. Vocal. And they play Fetch. Really. Fetch.

We spent a great deal of time and effort to bring our two half-sister, traditional Siamesers, to France with us when we moved here from the States. Nine and ten years old. Together all of their lives. It just didn't work out.

Mimi slipped out of the house one night and never found her way back home. Chloe, who was sick with a persistent infection at the time, wasted away from a broken heart. Very sad. But this was not the first time that we had to say goodbye to our shorter-lived furry children. When you've been married for over 40 years and shared your home with cats during all of that time, you've known generations.

So our Goodbyes have led to Hellos. A neighbor lady, knowing that we had lost Mimi, gifted us a village kitten. Not quite Siamese. Snowshoe mix, perhaps. A little devil. Sylvie. And a breeder supplied Illiah, purebred, cute as a button. Siamese to the core. Fetch.

Here they are. Because cats are a thing...

Chloe (left) and Mimi
Sylvie at Rest
Chloe and Sylvie









Sylvie
Illiah
The Cat in the Hat





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