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SNOW IN THE LANGUEDOC - IT DOES, YOU KNOW


 One of the reasons that we moved to the south of France was Cathey's vow, "I will never shovel snow again." Well, we won't have to shovel but it was a bit of a shock to wake up to a dusting of the white stuff.  It's the first week of February, after all. The temperature has seldom dipped below freezing and this is the first hint off wintry precipitation. So I suppose that we can't complain. However Sylvie, less than a year old, was befuddled. And once a flake landed on her nose, she wanted nothing more to do with the stuff except at a distance.


An hour after these pictures were taken, the snow was gone. Melted. As one friend in the States put it, the beauty of snow without the shoveling.

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  1. Having spent most of my life in a cold enviorment including 11 mos in Korea (coldest place on earth short of Siberia) volunteered for a tour in "sunny" France. Was posted to Moulins (Allier) and arrived in 1955 which turned out to be the coldest winter in memory (Allier mRiver froze solid). After military delivered mail in foot for 33 years in New Jerseyh which has some rather cold periods. Now fully retired thought (passing only) of Florida but that is not in the cards so will probably return to my beloved France. Bob Jeffery

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